How long is your sponsor responsible for you as a LPR?

I am 25, my brother filed for me in 2006 and I lived in CA before going to college.
After college I moved to FL and got married in 2014. My husband and I are now
separated after he abandoned me and left me with nothing and no place to live. I
went to my family home in Jamaica because I had no where to go and my sponsor
was not willing to accommodate me. I have been traveling back and forth and
staying with friends. Now I am back in CA and have only been here for 2 weeks but
my sponsor is already putting me out, even though I am pregnant. I have no where
else to go so I may be forced to go back to Jamaica where I can live with the father
of my baby until I can figure out where to stay in the US. What can I do so as not to
lose my status as a LPR?

Asked on March 6, 2017 under Immigration Law, California

Answers:

SB Member California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Well, first of all, the sponsor is not required to accomodate you in any way or pay for you in any way.  They are only liable if you apply for and obtain public assistance that triggers the affidavit of support.  What about work?  Can you not work in order to earn money to live?  Are you able to get any assistance as part of the divorce process?  If the baby you are pregnant with is your husband's, then you should also be eligible for spousal support once the baby is born.  You really should consult with a family attorney in your area so you understand your options under that area of law.  The LPR status will not be lost as long as you maintain permanent residence in the US and are not outside the US for too long.  If you intend to reside outside the US for an extended period of time, you should apply for a reentry permit ,which will preserve your permanent resident status but will enable you to be outside the US for up to 2 years (and can be renewed)


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