How do I get my money back after I bought a vehicle that was under false pretense?

I was buying a vehicle from a coworker who said he could help. He first showed me a Toyota good condition, interior clean, A/C worked, registration good and up to date. Then, 3 days later, when I brought the money to him for the car, he took my payment and said I had to wait another day for the title to be done correctly. The next day his wife came to have me sign the title. After I signed they walked me to the car, and it was a different car, a ford taurus. Worse condition, A/C didn’t work, and it made a funny noise. I immediately called him and he assured me that was the car he was talking about. He said the toyota doesn’t run well. Trying to find the positive in all this and that I really needed a car, I gave it a chance. I drove it home. However, the next day going to work, it wouldn’t go faster than 25 mph on the highway and the broke down as i pulled to the side of the highway. Frustrated, I made it to work and told him what happened. I told him I wanted my money back. That all of this felt like a big lie. He went and picked up the vehicle and had it taken back to his residence. How do I get him to just give me my money back?

Asked on October 20, 2017 under Business Law, Hawaii

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can sue your co- worker for fraud. Fraud is the intentional misrepresentation of a material fact made with knowledge of its falsity and with the intent to induce your reliance upon which you justifiably relied to your detriment.
In other words, you would not have purchased the car had you known its condition.
To recover your money , sue for fraud and enforce the court judgment in your favor with a wage garnishment.


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