How do I get my credit collections bill down to what I actually owe?

This debt agency has been contacting me for 2 years and the bill is from 3 years ago. There is 2 names on the bill but only my SSN. So their only contacting me instead of both of us. Myself and the 3rd party have seperated but this is from a daycare that our children were attending while we were together.They state that I owe $4,500 and I have submitted receipts to bring it down to $2,260 already; the business has no proof on how they came up with the $4,500 total.

Asked on March 25, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, North Dakota

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You need to be aware that under the laws of all states in this country, there is a time period for a person to file a lawsuit for the money owed allegedly. This is called the statute of limitations. Possibly the claim against you could be time barred by your state's statute of limitations.

As to the claim that you owe $4,500 where you believe you owe only $2,260, I would send documentation to the third party debt company with a detailed letter explaining your position. Keep the letter for future reference and need.

You might consider consulting with an attorney that practices in the area of consumer debt protection to assist you in your matter. One problem is that you and the other person listed on the debt may be jointly and severally responsible for the total claimed even though you have seemingly paid down your share to $2,260.


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