How can I get out of an auto contract if the dealership mislead the product?

Bought a car 2 days ago. The salesperson told us we were not able to get a better car. Were told the car passed safety check. Reluctantly signed the papers to find out the struts are bad, which are a safety hazard. We also have to get the ball joints replaced, another hazard. They sold us the car for $9000 when it is worth $2000. The car is 11 years old and has 110,000 miles on it and I feel we were greatly taken advantage of considering we went there with our youngest son and they could tell we needed to have a car as soon as possible.

Asked on November 3, 2011 under General Practice, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You have to forget about whether you went there with your youngest son, whether  the dealer knew you needed a car desparately and took advantage of that fact, or whether the salesperson told you that you could not get a better car--those facts may mean that the dealership was unfair, but it's not illegal to take advantage of a customer's distraction or desparation, to tell them they're getting the best car possible for them.

If the car could not pass a safety check while the struts were bad, so that the representation that the car had passed a safety check was false, or you can otherwise prove they lied about the safety check, then you may have grounds to rescind the contract for fraud. You would, assuming the dealer doesn't take the car back, sue them. Given the amount involved, you'd go to


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.