How can I find out what is written in my deceased mother’s Will?

My mother died this month. My sister has taken over her estate and will not provide the Will for her siblings to see what was written. I am the second oldest child of my mother and I have talked with my sister regarding my mother’s estate. She told she was Power of Attorney and beneficiary of my mother’s entire retirement account. It’s hard for me to believe that my mom would only choose her as the only sole person over her estate.AS an heir, what are my rights to my moms estate? What steps can I take in order for us not to fight over this matter and to make sure everything is fair?

Asked on August 30, 2016 under Estate Planning, Texas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If the will has been entered into probate, then you (or any one for that matter) can view it, as it is now a matter of public record. If it has not yet been filed with the court, then then if you are listed in the Will as a beneficiary, you should be notified and given a copy of the Finally, as an "interested party", that is someone would stand to inherit if there was no Will, you have the right to see a copy. At this point, since your sister is not being cooperative, you can contact the county probate court or you can consult directly with a local probate attorney. They can best advise you further. 


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