How can I find out if someone received a settlement from Workmen’s Compensation Insurance?

Someone near and dear to me got injured at work and had a very hard time financially. I loaned this person several thousand dollars with the promise that I would be repaid after they got on their feet or received a settlement. The person told me they were awarded a settlement but had not been paid. Since then about 50 days have passed. I feel this person is giving me the runaround especially since I found out that this person mad some very extensive purchases in excess of $20,000. I believe that this person has been paid.

Asked on July 16, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Maryland

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Access to information regarding suits or claims made depends on the type of case that it is and the state involved.  In Court cases - filed in a Civil Court - certain information is public record and kept in the court file.  If the matter was filed in a civil court then you would research the party involved through the court records in the area he resides, which is most likely where it was filed.  Not all information is public.  Some is private.  Workman's compensation cases and their resulting settlements are administrative in nature and often never result in a court case.  So obtaining the information may in fact be impossible.

Maryland's Workers Compensation Commission handles the filing and adjudication of workers compensation claims. 

If you think that he is holding out on you sue him for repayment of the loan.  Seek help on how to do this especially if it was an oral agreement. If you get far enough then he has to disclose certain information as to his finances and the settlement will be one of them.  He isn't that "dear" if he is shirking his obligation here.  Good luck.

 


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