What happens if your car insurance I cancelled for not answering a questionnaire?

I’m using my car for doing Uber sometimes. I have my insurance company for 8 months now, all payment I made was on time, I have clean driver record and never asked for clam. However, a month ago my insurance company sent me a letter with questions – am I doing uber/lyft, what I use my car for, who are my rider, do I plan to ask tax reimbursement, etc. I ignored this mail (what if I simply didn’t get it?), as I realized they can increase or cancel my current insurance. They then sent another letter that they were going to cancel my insurance in 14 days, since I failed to provide questionnaire letter. What is the best to do in such a situation? How to cancel their insurance correctly so it won’t be in my record?

Asked on December 13, 2015 under Insurance Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You can't just voluntarily cancel car insurance without either getting new insurance to replace it or providing proof you no longer have the car or are no longer driving it. Best for you would be to get new insurance from a new company based on accurantly disclosing that you drive for Uber. Bear in mind that if you get into an accident while driving for Uber, if you did not disclose that you do this to the insurer, the insurer can likely refuse to pay on the grounds you obtained insurance under false pretenses. To have coverage you can rely, you need to disclose how you use your car.


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