Harrasment Post Divorce – revised

My ex-wife files contempt motions if my alimony/child support check is one day late, or just if she feels like causing trouble. I live in another state. Every time she does this I have to miss work, lose at least a days wages, and spend considerable $$ on travelling to court. Long long can she keep getting away with this? My job is in jeapordy and it’s causing financial hardship. Can I file a harrassment charge and have her ordered to stop? Perhaps I should mention an attny charges $300/hr and I make $30/hr. Cannot hire an attorney.

Asked on June 9, 2009 under Family Law, Connecticut

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

What you need to do is file your own motion with the court. if you cannot afford an attorney call the clerk and see if they will walk you through the process. Another option is safeguard yourself. ensure alimony checks are early and send them certified. this way you have proof of receipt. do everything you can to ensure she has no ammunition even if not valid ammunition

You can go into court and explain the situation. if she forces you to miss work and spend money travelling and her case ends up being frivolous make a cross motion for damages. If you do this a couple times she may stop filing these actions if she is required to pay you for your lost wages and time if the motion is frivolous

Defiantly call the clerk they are very helpful with walking you through how to file and proceed in matters like this


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