Family member agreed to pay medical insurance costs, and didn’t leading to termination of insurance. Are they liable?

My mother and I have a long standing agreement that she was to be paying my medical bills until I was married. When it came time to enter the bank information she reviewed it, double checked everything and submitted it. She put the wrong account number in, one that she says does not even exsist. With no payment made, my medical insurance lapsed due to nonmpayment. Now, because of cost of medicine and healthcare psychological, therapy for suicidal feelings, severe depression and anxiety, a pain management doctor for 2 bulging discs and sciatica pain, along with pulmonary doctors to assist with my asthma medication, as well as a thyroid specialist for hypothyroidism All of these ailments are documented. I am unable to work, have had constant debilitating pain. After begging to have 1/3rd of my medicine taken care of financially, she is now refusing to pay for my meds. Because of said cost roughly $2500 a month I do not have any way to see a doctor for my back sciatica, let alone a primary doctor. If I paid for all of my healthcare I would either be homeless and or hungry. Not to even mention the wedding that I have coming up in less then 60 days that she refuses to just now pay for just a wedding dress. All of these thing have been promised to me for over 2 years. Since it was her doing and not my insurance company, I cannot receive any compensation from them. Leaving me with no care. After explaining this, she told me to

Asked on July 13, 2017 under Personal Injury, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

A promise freely made,, including a promise to pay for your insurance, is NOT enforceable unless the promise was part of a contract in which you gave her something in exchange for paying your insurance costs: for example, if you had contractually agreed to provide certain services for her, like maintaining or cleaning her home, doing shopping for her, etc. Without some "consideration" (or thing or service of value) you provided to her specifically in exchange for the insurance payments, there was no enforceable contract, only a "gratuitious promise" which she could renege on, without penalty, at will. The law enforces contracts; it does not enfore mere promises.


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