Does my company have the right to take my photo without my knowledge or consent and then later use it?

I work for a retail company called rue21, and my district manager takes photos of
bad examples of things and uses them in a slideshow presentation at the annual
manager meetings to basically have a laugh. Photos include botched mannequins,
incorrect window displays, and other things that can go wrong in retail. Today I
found out that she included a photo of me in my workplace, which I did not have
any knowledge of her taking. She also did not ask for my permission before taking
the photo or using it in her slideshow, where she and other members of upper
management essentially made fun of me at a corporate sponsored event. I was
wondering what my rights were in regards to this sort of situation and what legal
grounds the company has to use my photo in a demeaning way without my knowledge
or consent.

Asked on March 25, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Utah

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If you work someplace knowing of itsemployment policies or practices, you are held to have implicitly consent to them--that is your agreement to them is found in or demonstated by your continuing to work there (and not quitting/resigning) when you know what the employer does. You obviously know that that they take photographs of employees to use as examples in mangerial meetings; therefore, by continuing to work there, you have consented to allowing them to do this.


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