Do my parents have a legal right to stop me?

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Do my parents have a legal right to stop me?

I am a 24 year old senior mechanical engineering student. I currently live at home with my parents and I plan to move out very soon. They don’t approve of my girlfriend and have harassed her and intimidated her. My parents have spent some money toward my college education, but they no longer do. I work full time and can afford to move out. Is there any legal way that they can stop me from moving out? I need to know my rights if they try to physically stop me or take illegal measures to stop me. They are very narcissistic Indian parents who try to control my life.

Asked on August 16, 2017 under Estate Planning, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, you are a (we assume) mentally competent adult (have not been adjudged incompetent based on medical evidence of incompetence or had a legal guardian appointed for you); mentally competent adults may do as they like, live where they want, move out or move away whenever they want, etc. Your parents have no legal right to stop you from moving out. If they do something illegal, call the police and press charges for the appropriate criminal act (e.g. using force to restrain you, even just grabbing and holding you, is assault at a minimum; taking money or car keys or phone or something else you need is theft; trying to sabotage your plans by calling up a landlord, pretending to be you, and claiming you changed you mind about renting would be a form of identity theft; etc.). The police should help if illegal or criminal means are used against you.


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