Do I have to pay ambulance fee when my Social Security insurance states that I am to pay $60 co-pay, but this is waived if hospitalized?

I was rushed to hospital from the doctor’s office, the service was called from the doctor’s staff. I belong to ambulance club but this service was not the one that I belong to. I paid the $60 co-pay for the ambulance services even though I was admitted to hospital. The service stated later that they would reimburse me; I have never received this Then I get a $900+ paramedic bill. My insurance states that “If admitted the co-pay is waived”; I am on social security. I was under the assumption that the paramedics was included with the ambulance services.

Asked on October 6, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Good question. You need to direct the ambulance company that you have a $900 plus bill to your insurance carrier so that you can get the $900 claim against you resolved sooner rather than later. You also need to speak with someone with your insurance carrier about this bill and follow up the telephone call with a written letter keeping a copy of it for future need.

Unfortunately you have a situation where you are held hostage between the ambulance company's bill and the uncertainty with your insurance carrier.

There are also organizations that possibly can assist you further regarding your current situation such as legal aid, your county's bar association, and the Council for Aging.

Good luck.


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