Do I have the right to a refund if a metal issue interferes with me using the service?

I signed a contract to attend a 3 day conference that cost 1995. Although the
contract did state that refunds would be given, I have medical issues that limit
me from being physically able to attend the conference. I did not use any of
their services or gain anything from the company. I feel that due to medical
issues there should be a way to get my entire payment back. I am not just opting
out of something, my disease will make it almost physically possible to deal with
and meet tons and tons of new people at once.

Asked on April 8, 2016 under Business Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Without being unsympathetic to your situation, your medical issue is YOUR medical issue...not the conferance organizers. They are not obligated to take account of your medical issue, any more than you'd be required to pay them if, say, their critical staff were sick and could not put on the conferance; in that case, if they could not perform due to illness, you would not have to pay them anything--their illness would not entitle them to anything. Similarly, you illness does not entitle you to anything, and the law does not give you a refund. You can only get whatever refund the terms of service or agreement gives you, or which they voluntarily choose to offer you.


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