Do I have any rights regarding my boss’s treatment of me?

I am an IT administrator at a publicly traded company. My CEO makes me work on his personal stuff during business and weekend hours. I have installed doorbells and cameras at his house, setup smart TVs at his house, been flown on company time to his other houses to put in dropcams and deliver Christmas trees to his houses. He will call me during business and weekend hours to fix his wife’s printers and IPads and his purchase his children’s phones on company money and time. He threatens my job if I don’t answer him immediately on personal stuff on the weekends or during business hours when I am working on company related stuff. He also will come up behind me, and rub my shoulders as hard as he can. I have come to my wits end and I was just seeing if any of this is legal from a company standpoint? Am I required to work on his personal and family’s stuff even if it is not company related? I am a salaried employee, so I do not have required hours, but to be threatened with my job if I can’t fix something over the weekend or during business hours does not seem right. The shoulder rubbing gets uncomfortable as well. Do I have any rights, or do I just suck it up?

Asked on September 21, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If the shoulder rubbing has some sexual component to it, then you may have a claim for sexual harassment at work; if you believe that to be the case, you should contact the federal EEOC to file a complaint.
Nothing else you describe is illegal unless you have a written employment contract and the behavior (e.g. the hours; working on personal projects for the CEO; etc.) violates the terms of contract. Otherwise, you are an employee at will, and may have the terms or conditions of your job changed at will; can have the hours or days you work adjusted; can be required to do any work that your employer (i.e. the CEO) wants you you to do; can be required to do personal projects for your employer, because your employer (the CEO) decides what is and is not part of your job; and can be terminated at any time, for any reason, including that you are not taking care of the CEO's personal projects the way or as fast as he'd like. Not to put too fine a point on, but employees at will essentially have no rights at work.


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