What tod o about an illegal charge on my credit card?

A few years ago a charge showed up on a credit card I did not use. I called the company and told them. However, I continued to get late fees added. I contacted them again and they said the item was shipped to my address. Again I told them I did not get it. They asked if anyone in my household ordered anything. The only one in the household besides me was my 15 year old niece who was visiting. I asked her if she or her friends used my card and she said no. I contacted the company back and told them. I now am getting credit collection notices and letters from an attorney. How can I get this resolved?

Asked on November 28, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, North Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The problem that you have is that instead of calling the company that charged you an item on your credit card to contest it, you should have called your credit card company to state that there was an improper charge on your credit card and have your credit card company take over the matter.

Worse now is that a significant amount of time has passed since the charge and now (several years ago). In the situation that you are in, it is always prudent to contest the charge with your credit card company right away.

I would contact the company that is seeking the payment from you and ask for all shipping invoices to show where the item was shipped that you supposedly ordered. If the shipping manifest shows shipment to your residence at the time, it appears that to get the matter resolved you will simply have to pay the invoice due to you letting too much time pass before contesting the charge with your own credit card company.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.