Contractor invoices

Hi,

Do I have a legal case against my company if
they sent my invoice to the wrong party. The
invoice displays my name and hourly rate and
has been sent to subordinates.

Asked on June 7, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, District of Columbia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, there is no legal case against them.
1) First and foremost, this is NOT intrinsically private, confidential, or protected information: anyone who knows it may share it with anyone else, unless and only in the case that they signed a written non-disclosure or confidentiality agreemen to not reveal it. It is unprofessional to reveal, but unprofessional does not equal illegal.
2) Second, what would you sue for? The law only provides compensation for provable, quantifiable losses, injuries or damage. It is difficult to see the injury or damage caused by this, in the sense of seeing any appreciable amount of (if, indeed any at all) compensation to which you'd be entited. (How has this cost you money, for example?)

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, there is no legal case against them.
1) First and foremost, this is NOT intrinsically private, confidential, or protected information: anyone who knows it may share it with anyone else, unless and only in the case that they signed a written non-disclosure or confidentiality agreemen to not reveal it. It is unprofessional to reveal, but unprofessional does not equal illegal.
2) Second, what would you sue for? The law only provides compensation for provable, quantifiable losses, injuries or damage. It is difficult to see the injury or damage caused by this, in the sense of seeing any appreciable amount of (if, indeed any at all) compensation to which you'd be entited. (How has this cost you money, for example?)


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