Claiming abandoned piece of land Texas

There is a piece of land with a rundown building that has
been abandoned for about 20years I’ve tried to find the
property in th county appraisal district, and the county tax
assessor and could not find a single document to this land
and I wish to make a shop there any help?

Asked on March 13, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can't claim it legally other than by adverse possession, which is the legal mechanism for claiming another's land when you don't have title to it (but which will take typically 10 years of your occupancy and use of the land, during which time you could lose it if the owner surfaces and brings legal action to reclaim it) or by purchasing it from a tax sale or foreclosure sale. If the county takes it for upaid taxes, you could buy it then; otherwise, though, there is no way to claim this land unless you are willing to just start using it and hoping that no one comes back to claim it for the next 10 years.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can't claim it legally other than by adverse possession, which is the legal mechanism for claiming another's land when you don't have title to it (but which will take typically 10 years of your occupancy and use of the land, during which time you could lose it if the owner surfaces and brings legal action to reclaim it) or by purchasing it from a tax sale or foreclosure sale. If the county takes it for upaid taxes, you could buy it then; otherwise, though, there is no way to claim this land unless you are willing to just start using it and hoping that no one comes back to claim it for the next 10 years.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.