Can we move out or discard ex-boyfriend’s property and some household goods if we have given him 2-weeks notice?

Ex-boyfriend moved out over 7 months ago but he left personal property and some household goods (bed, etc) in garage. He’s been saying he would move the property out for several months. We finally gave him a deadline or else we would move the property out of the garage and put in driveway and whatever happens, happens. He verbally acknowledged this deadline and what we would do. Is there some liability or anything that we could be held accountable for for taking this action?

Asked on October 25, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you want to get rid of items left behind by your former boyfriend, it is very important that you give him notice of the need to pick up the items by a certain date which you have. If the items in your opinion are worth less than $300 collectively, then you should be able to discard them any way you want to. Meaning, you can throw them away, donate them to charity or leave them on the street for pick up by some third person.

If they are worth more than $300 in your opinion, you should take them to a third party offsite storage center and place the rental in your former boyfriend's name with his last known address and telephone number. Give him written notice of where the items are located. If he does not pay the monthly rental or pick them up, the storage company will auction off the contents to pay the monthly fee.


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