Can someone be fired for being accused of being a bully?

My father has worked as a elderly care assistance for a couple of years in a assisted living facility. His job consists of taking care of the residents eating, changing clothes, etc. He also supervises others. He is adored by all the residents and treats them as if they were relatives, including the ones he doesn’t take care of. Additionally, he is admired by most of the staff and management and has received accolades for his work over and over and recently received a promotion. However, there is one person who works there that states he is a bully. If you know my dad, he is the kind of person who won’t tolerant improper care of these people. He was really close to his father and expects all the employees to treat the residence with the same respect and care. apparently she is a whiner and cries at the drop of a hat. He is stern with her and she interpreted it as bullying. last week she reported him to management for this reason

Asked on June 15, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Someone can be fired for being a bully, or for any reason, or for no reason at all, with or without notice. The fact is that most employment is "at will", which means that a company can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit. The exception would be if this action violated the tems of company policy, an employment contract or union agreement. Also, such treatment must not have constituted some form of legally actionable discrimination.


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