can my parole extend past the sentence time

i was convicted of a **** crime on july 10 2001 and recieved a neg. plea of 20 years with 12 years suspended leaving 8. I was eligible for boot camp and completed it on 3-27-02 and was released on parole. I have not violated my parole or committed any crimes. i thought i would be off parole on july 10 2009. my parole officer has told me that their computer shows april 10 2010. she also stated that was my problem and she wouldnt even bother to check it out. on july 10 i would like to tell her where to put her attitude. thank you

Asked on June 10, 2009 under Criminal Law, Arkansas

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

It sounds like the boot camp time wasn't included in figuring the eight years.  I'm not an Arizona attorney, so I can't tell you whether this was done correctly or not.  If you want to try and have that time credited to your sentence served, you will probably have to get the prosecutor to agree.  Something like this gets very technical, and if getting off parole earlier matters enough, you should have an attorney's help.  One place to find a qualified lawyer, if the one who represented you originally isn't available, is our website, http://attorneypages.com

I'd recommend that you don't depend on the calendar;  wait until you have something in writing that tells you that you are done.  Your parole officer's "attitude" can do a lot worse than you can manage by giving her lip, until then.


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