Can my ex-girlfriend legally change the locks on our double wide trailer without my permission?

I recently broke up with my girlfriend whom I shared a double wide trailer home with. Both of our names are on the mortgage and on the lot lease (we lived in a land lease community). We broke up, I moved back in with my parents and changed my address. She says she is refinancing so that she can be the sole owner. Can she legally change the locks on the place and if so can I legally change them back or kick the door in? Also, she works during the evenings and lets her new boyfriend stay at the house when she’s not there. Can I legally kick him out when she’s not there?

Asked on November 7, 2011 under Family Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Even if you no longer live there, if you are on the mortgage and the lot lease, you have a right to possession (e.g. to enter and/or live there); she cannot evict you in any fashion, particularly by simply changing the locks.

You do not have a right to kick out her guests, however--her boyfriend can stay there when she is not.

You should contact an attorney; you probably want to see about some way of getting yourself off the lease and the mortgage, if you and she are no longer in a relationship and you no longer live there. That will probably involve some payment and negotiation, even if she is interested in doing this, but it's worth exploring.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Even if you no longer live there, if you are on the mortgage and the lot lease, you have a right to possession (e.g. to enter and/or live there); she cannot evict you in any fashion, particularly by simply changing the locks.

You do not have a right to kick out her guests, however--her boyfriend can stay there when she is not.

You should contact an attorney; you probably want to see about some way of getting yourself off the lease and the mortgage, if you and she are no longer in a relationship and you no longer live there. That will probably involve some payment and negotiation, even if she is interested in doing this, but it's worth exploring.


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