Can I take mypregnant 16year old girlfriend to a different state in order to get married legally?

I am 17 and we both love each other so very much and we will do literally anything to be together. Her parents won’t consent to us getting married but mine will. I can’t describe in words how much I love her, and we will do whatever it takes as long as it’s legal. Want to go from IL -to GA.

Asked on September 12, 2011 under Family Law, Indiana

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I know that this is a very stressful time for both of you but I really urge you not to take her over state lines with out herparent's consent.  It is great that your parents are supportive of your decision.  But they can not give consent for someone that they are not legally responsible for - your girlfriend.  And she is still a minor and under the control of her parents.  You could be hauled in for kidnapping even if you argue she went willingly.  They can sue you, not necessarily her. And from what I am reading about Georgia's requirements, it may not be greener grass there, as one would say.  You still may need parental consent to obtain a marriage license. So running off there may not help you anyway.  Antoher avenue that may help your situation is if your girlfriend declares herself emancipated.  She would need to file a Petition for Emancipation.  That I would consult a lawyer for and maybe your parents can help there too.  Good luck. 


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