Can I sue my employer for firing me for no reason?

A couple of weeks ago I had to call in to work. On the first day I took my pregnant daughter into the doctor because of some pains she was having. I did let my employer know of the situation which she understood. The next day while I was preparing to go to work I called in due to personal reason which, again she said she understood. I have a relative who also worked at this same place. I let my employer know my phone had been disconnected so, she was contacting me through my relative that worked there also. That, afternoon my relative brought it to my attention that, our employer had contacted her to work my shifts that weekend and to let me know that my shifts would be covered that weekend through Wednesday of the next week and then I was scheduled to be off Thursday and Friday, and return to work on Saturday and Sunday. Well, before Tuesday was over my relative stops by to ask me what happened and I didn’t understand what she meant. She shows me a text message from my boss asking her to cover my shifts again and I ask why she says she has no clue. At this point I call my boss to find out what was going on because, the last time she contacted my relative she didn’t want me to go back into work until that weekend according to her text messages to my relative. So, my relative and I are were a bit confused. I call the boss and her words were I had to do something and when I kept asking her what she meant she continued to say I had to do something. I finally say did I lose my job? Her response was I had to do something I’m sorry. She also took it upon herself to tell other employees about firing me which, I felt was violating my rights. Is there anything I can do about all of this?

Asked on July 6, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Unless this action violated the terms of an employment contract or union agreemnt, it was legal. The fact is that a company can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit (absent some form of legally actionable discrimination). This includes who to fire, when and why. In fact, a worker can be terminated for any reason or no reason at all, with or without notice. Additinally, there is no right to privacy regarding an employer disclosing to co-workerse that an employee was discharged.


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