What canI sue forin a breach of contract lawsuit?

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What canI sue forin a breach of contract lawsuit?

My sister-in-law and I entered into a contract. She agreed to take over my car payments; maintain insurance/registration, pay note on time, and get the car in her name. Contact says if she does not, I can repossess the car with the understanding that the car will be returned to me in the condition in which it was given. 1 year, and 7 months later, I took the car because she continuously paid the car note late, resulting in the finance company reporting it on my credit. She failed to pay registration, which is now 1 year over due, forced insurance was added to my loan balance,and she damaged the cat in the amount of approximately $500 plus.

Asked on August 3, 2010 under Business Law, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In a breach of contract case, you can sue for the benefit of the contract or bargain--what you should have gotten, or the difference between what you received and what you had bargained for. You can also sue for damages foreseeably and directly flowing from the breach. While you should speak with an attorney to evalutate your case and potential damages, the sorts of things you might be able to sue for here are: (1) the cost to repair the car; (2) anything she should have paid, but refused or failed to; and/or (3) additional costs, like the additional insurance, which you have been forced to shoulder. You may even be able to get some compensation for damage to your credit, though not definitely--still, it would be worth exploring with your attorney.


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