Can I sue regarding not being hired due to my criminal history background?

I applied at a gym for work. I got hired on the spot but then the next week I kept calling with no response. I looked up my friend on facebook whose husband worked at the gym, and found that she had blocked me on facebook. Then I looked up her husband and he had blocked me also on facebook. I texted her to find out what was going on. She said that the people at the gym sent her husband a copy of my criminal background showing that I was a sex offender and then he sent it to her. The

guy was just an employee not any part of management and I feel like they didn’t have the right to do that? Is there anything that I can do?

Asked on March 9, 2017 under Criminal Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, you cannot sue:
1) Employers are allowed to not hire employees--or to fire them--due to criminal backgrounds; this is legal.
2) Your criminal record is considered a public record (unless it was expunged or sealed), and anyone may legally share a public record with any other person.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, you cannot sue:
1) Employers are allowed to not hire employees--or to fire them--due to criminal backgrounds; this is legal.
2) Your criminal record is considered a public record (unless it was expunged or sealed), and anyone may legally share a public record with any other person.


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