Can I request a payment back from a chiropractor if I have decided not to return and my insurance company covers all appointments I have been to?

I had originally gone to the chiropractor because I had a pinched nerve in my lower back. I was desperate enough for the pain to be addressed that I was willing to sign up for 35 sessions, and had I not been in so much pain I probably would have declined so many appointments. I believe my vulnerability was taken advantage of. I called the office and explained to them about my car, told them I would need to put my appointments on hold, and asked if I could postpone my next payment. I was told that I could not even though my insurance company has already been billed as well.

Asked on August 2, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you medical insurance is paying for your visits to the chiropractor you are seeing and you no longer wish to continue the sessions, you are not entitled to the funds authorized by your health care provider. 

I would write the chiropractor's office and your health care insurance carrier the same letter advising that you are discontinuing treatment. Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you medical insurance is paying for your visits to the chiropractor you are seeing and you no longer wish to continue the sessions, you are not entitled to the funds authorized by your health care provider. 

I would write the chiropractor's office and your health care insurance carrier the same letter advising that you are discontinuing treatment. Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need.


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