CanI get unemployment ifI quit my job due to medical illness?

I had 3 blackout spells and breathing problems that put me off work for a month. i was in the hospital for a week. The neurologist told me not to drive for 6 months. I live 40 miles from work. also the neurologist told me if I feel like I can’t do my job properly do not go to work. I suffer from daily headaches and back pain, which I feel I could not do my job. The doctors messed up my FMLA paperwork and I am not covered for a good amount of the days I missed. They are unexcused on my attendance. I feel I am getting messed around and I cannot keep going with no income.

Asked on September 20, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You should consult with an employment lawyer. Usually, if you leave a job voluntarily, even for a very good reason, you can't get unemployment; typically, the only exceptions are for when the job has changed in some way making your continued employment impossible. An attorney can review your specific situation in detail and verify if this is indeed the case--that you are ineligible for  unemployment.

(Note: even if you were eligible for it, it's not a permanent income replacement.)

However, there are other  options you should discuss with a lawyer. For example, are you eligible for disability? Might you be eligible for SSSI? If your condition is traceable in whole or in part to your job, could you possibly claim for worker's compensation or sue your company? Unemployment is only one of several options potentially available  to you. Good luck.


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