Can I be terminated and denied unemployment for failing to provide an official transcript a year after I gave an unofficial copy?

I was fired and given one reason however when I filed for unemployment they said it was failure to provide an official transcript. I gave officials and copies of my degree when hired and 8 months ago during a meeting, all employees were told to bring in updated transcripts. I had nothing to update but went to get transcript and owed a balance. I gave my employers an unofficial copy a month later which they took. Then 2 months after that I was fired. I never heard word of the copy was unacceptable nor that I would lose my job because of it. If unacceptable why did it take 2 months to terminate me?

Asked on December 10, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

When an employee violates a workplace rule, policy, or directive of his or her employee, he or she may be terminated for cause, and so be ineligible for unemployment compensation. No law requires the employer to move or take action immediately on a rule, etc. violation--they may take their time and act later.


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