Can I be called into work after my employer announced that the office will be closed for the day?

Due to the air quality in CA, my job a childcare center which my children attend sent out an email at 6pm stating we would be closed the following day. Then at 10 pm they announced through our facebook page that if the air quality was better we would be open and they would let us know in the morning. I commute about an hour to work and I’ve scheduled appointments for tomorrow since I was told I would be off. Is my boss legally allowed to do this? Change our schedules this late at night or early morning essentially putting us on call with very little notice?

Asked on November 18, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Unless this action violates the terms of an employment contract or unionagreement, you can be required to report back to work at anytime. The fact is that most work relationships are "at will", which means that a company can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit (absent some form of legally actionable discrimination).

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Unless this action violates the terms of an employment contract or unionagreement, you can be required to report back to work at anytime. The fact is that most work relationships are "at will", which means that a company can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit (absent some form of legally actionable discrimination). 


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