can an Employer make a person work for seven straight days even though the new week starts within that seven days

First of all the week starts on sunday.
I work thur fri sat the new week
start sun sun Mon Tues wed. Which is
seven days without an off day between
the seven days. then I’m off thur and
Fri can is this legal

Asked on April 1, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Actually, there is no law requiring that you have to get a day off unless you work in certan specified jobs in certain specified industries--most manufacturing, hospitality, theater, and apt. management. If you're not in a protected industry or job, you can be made to work 365 days a year without a break. Here's a link to a PDF which has the protected jobs: https://www.labor.ny.gov/formsdocs/wp/LS611.pdf
 
Even if you are in one of those jobs, it's one day of rest evey calendar week, it appears that it does not have to be the same day each week, so long as you are given at the start of the week notice of the day. So say that week 1, you had Sunday off. Sunday of week 2, you are told your day off will be next Saturday. You would have worked 13 straight days while complying with the law.


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