Can a Principal of an elementary school ban a teacher’s spouse from coming to the school after a discussion over a sick note policy?

Principal seems to be singling out a certain teacher for multiple things over the
last 12 years. Latest the need for a sick note and the spouse took the sick note
to school and questioned the policy and had a discussion regarding why none of
the other teachers have to follow this policy. No threats, cussing, yelling
involved. Spouse remained calm, but opinionated. Spouse received certified
letter 3 weeks later stating she is no longer allowed on school property which
she rarely is. This seems to be a power play and more harassment stating her
dislike. Seems over the top? Any thoughts or tips?

Asked on April 9, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

It  may seem over the top, but it is legal: an employer--including a school--may exclude any non-employees, including spouses, from the employer's property, and can also refuse to talk to a non-employee spouse about issue involving the employee spouse. There is nothing legally improperty in what you describe. The spouse should stay out of things: it was unprofessional for a non-employee spouse to question an employment policy on behalf of an employee. If the employee spouse has a question about or issue with a policy, the employee should discuss it with management and not bring the spouse into it. For example, my wife is the HR director for a company and she would *never* discuss employee issues or employment policy with a non-employee, even a spouse.


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