Can a pregnant person be dropped from Medicaid?

I was on Medicaid and became pregnant. My medicaid was due to end 02/28 and I submitted my pregnancy change on 02/22. My Medicaid benefits still

ended even though I was told by a DCF person that I could not be dropped. My family income changed in April and I submitted for pregnancy Medicaid again. I was approved in May and told I have pregnancy Medicaid coverage for

May, June, July and ongoing. My family’s income increased and now my

pregnancy Medicaid is ending 06/18. Is there anything I can do to keep this? I didn’t think a pregnant person who did qualify at one time could be dropped. Also, according to the family-related Medicaid factsheet for FL, it says that if your income goes up like mine did, you are supposed to have 12 months of extended Medicaid. Why didn’t that apply to me?

Asked on June 4, 2018 under Insurance Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Medicaid eligibility is income-based; whenever your income exceeds limits, you lose Medicaid coverage. The fact that you are currently pregnant or have some other condition (e.g. diabetes) does not require them to extend your Medicaid. As the fact-sheet says, you *may* be eligible for extended Medicaid, but it is not a guaranty and you have to apply for and be approved for the expansion. Go to the county office handling Medicaid in person--it is much harder to ignore you in person than it is to ignore (or not get) a phone call, and you are more likely to get assistance in person.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Medicaid eligibility is income-based; whenever your income exceeds limits, you lose Medicaid coverage. The fact that you are currently pregnant or have some other condition (e.g. diabetes) does not require them to extend your Medicaid. As the fact-sheet says, you *may* be eligible for extended Medicaid, but it is not a guaranty and you have to apply for and be approved for the expansion. Go to the county office handling Medicaid in person--it is much harder to ignore you in person than it is to ignore (or not get) a phone call, and you are more likely to get assistance in person.


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