Can a former employer refuse to complete student forms requesting information to be used for life experience credits at the university?

I am currently in school working to finish my degree. The university allows students to submit requests for life experience credit as it applies to work experience in the field. My former employer has refused to complete forms citing the reason that I no longer work for that company.
The university clearly states that any experience obtained within the previous five years is acceptable.
Do I have any recourse?

Asked on March 2, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If the employer had signed any agreement (e.g. as part of, say, some internship program from your school in which it was participating) in which they agreed to complete these forms, then they are obligated to do so--you could sue them, if necessary, to force them to do so. But in the absence of a written agreement to complete these forms, it is purely voluntary on their part whether to do this or not; they would have no legal obligation, other than through a contract or agreement, to do this.


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