can a cop arrest me after letting me go

I was stopped for a cracked taillight,
the officer asked me for my license and
it is suspended so i gave them my id
and the registration while looking for
the insurance, she came back and gave
us the rest of the stuff and said that
she has to respond to another call and
to fix the tail light. She didn’t give
me a ticket or and sort of paperwork.
The next morning i found a business
card with a number saying to call her.
When i called i was told she was on
shift until 6pm and they could not tell
me what it was about.

Asked on April 13, 2017 under General Practice, Kansas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Yes, you could be arrested after the fact, assuming that there is sufficient evidence, etc. to justify an arrest in the first place. There is no law saying that an arrest must be on the spot or not at all, or saying that if the officer chooses to not arrest initially, that doing so  bars the authorities from changing their mind and arresting you later.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Yes, you could be arrested after the fact, assuming that there is sufficient evidence, etc. to justify an arrest in the first place. There is no law saying that an arrest must be on the spot or not at all, or saying that if the officer chooses to not arrest initially, that doing so  bars the authorities from changing their mind and arresting you later.


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