What are my rightts regrading breaking a lease due to safety issues?

My apartment has been broken into as well as my car stolen within a 6 months time. I have spoke to my leasing office as well as the head corporate office leasing person. They claim I cannot break my lease. I fear for my safety as my neighbor across the hall less than a week from my breaking and entering, had the same to happen (fearing that they were coming back for my apartment). My lease is not up for another 8 months. I have a storm door and there is no trace of breaking and entering, police reports claims a key was used. I believe it was someone from the office. What should I do?

Asked on August 15, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Given what you have written, I suggest that you request management to re-key the lock to your door. I suggest that you install some recording device for your rental to depict who may be entering it when you are not there.

As to safety issues, I suggest that you as well as other tenants make written complaints to the property manager of the place where you rent about such issues and the need for better security. Keep a copy of the complaints for future reference and need. From what you have written, it does not appear that you have a legal basis at this time to terminate your lease based upon safety issues without recourse.


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