What can I do if a back injury I suffered from auto accident continues to flair up a year later?

It settled down for about 8 months. I tried going back to an active life style and life style I use to do before it. However, every time I try to go back to my regular routine I end up returning to the state of a couch potato due to my back flaring up. Work is becoming difficult, my life style is from active outgoing to couch potato, I have lost sleep, I have been in discomfort, I am seeking chiropractic assistance. I could go on and on about the details but this is the start. What should I do?

I asked my mother to finish up the clam with State Farm due to State Farm taking advantage of my disability and working the claim against me. I feel like I got snubbed on the settlement check. I got peer pressured into the minimum for 1,500 for pain and suffering and 95 coverage on loss wages. I have also changed my employment hours. I have gone from 40 hours to 32 or less with no more than 2-3 days in between. With a four day weekend every two weeks. Other wise my back pins me down. I dare not tell work this but I no longer allow my self to lift any thing above 25 pounds.

Asked on June 26, 2017 under Personal Injury, Washington

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, there is nothing that can be done because when you settled the case with State Farm you signed a release of all claims against the other party.
If the case had not been settled prematurely, you could have gotten additional medical treatment and considerably more in a settlement.  If the settlement terms were unacceptable, the settlement should have been rejected and a lawsuit for negligence filed against the at-fault party.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.