Auto accident my fault no insurance

Had an auto accident no insurance my fault. It was a
business car The owner of the truck wants
everything coverd car, employee medical bills and
time of work which is fine. How do i protect myself
by him not coming back and asking for more or his
employee or his insurance. What kind of lawyer can i
hire to help me with this case? Where and how?

Asked on June 6, 2018 under Accident Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

1) You are only liable if you were at-fault (that is, driving negligently or carelessly) in causing the accident; liability, or an obligation to pay, is based on fault, and you are not liable simple due to driving, if you were not otherwise at fault. You indicate that you were at fault, but note that if you re-think that and believe you could prove you were not at fault, you could defend on that basis.
2) You protect yourself with a written agreement (which you need to have executed or signed before handing over any money) which states that:
a) The payment you are making is payment in full of any and all claims, whether presently known or unknown, which he may have against you arising out of the accident; and
b) He will indemnify you (basically, pay on your behalf) any amounts which his insurer seeks from you due to the accident.
3) You can ask him to indemnify you for any claims that his employee makes against you, but quite frankly, he'd have to be very stupid and you'd have to be very lucky for him to agree to that: the employee is a separate person, witih his own claims, and there's no reason why the truck owner would undertake to pay the employee's claims for you.
a) You can settle with the employee for a mutually agreeable amount, of course, and if you do, enter into an agreement like the one described above.
4) There are lawyers who specialize in defending car accident claims--they'd be ideal. But any lawyer who handles car accidents or other tort (personal injury) claims in any capacity could help you.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

1) You are only liable if you were at-fault (that is, driving negligently or carelessly) in causing the accident; liability, or an obligation to pay, is based on fault, and you are not liable simple due to driving, if you were not otherwise at fault. You indicate that you were at fault, but note that if you re-think that and believe you could prove you were not at fault, you could defend on that basis.
2) You protect yourself with a written agreement (which you need to have executed or signed before handing over any money) which states that:
a) The payment you are making is payment in full of any and all claims, whether presently known or unknown, which he may have against you arising out of the accident; and
b) He will indemnify you (basically, pay on your behalf) any amounts which his insurer seeks from you due to the accident.
3) You can ask him to indemnify you for any claims that his employee makes against you, but quite frankly, he'd have to be very stupid and you'd have to be very lucky for him to agree to that: the employee is a separate person, witih his own claims, and there's no reason why the truck owner would undertake to pay the employee's claims for you.
a) You can settle with the employee for a mutually agreeable amount, of course, and if you do, enter into an agreement like the one described above.
4) There are lawyers who specialize in defending car accident claims--they'd be ideal. But any lawyer who handles car accidents or other tort (personal injury) claims in any capacity could help you.


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