If I want to back out on a lease and have my name removed but there is not an early termination clause, what are my options?

I am signed to a 2-bedroom, 4 person apartment. Due to an unfortunate turn of events, I no longer wish to live with the people I am signed with. If possible, I would like to completely remove my name from the lease. I have spoken to the landlord and asked about my choices. He explained that I could find a sublettor. This would not remove my name unless they offered me a reassignment though. It is a jointly and severally lease. wondering if there’s another route to pay a lump sum with the landlord. No early term. clause on lease. Tenants will pay full rate without me.

Asked on July 15, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Michigan

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you wish to get out of the lease that you are in which I understand the reasons for without any recourse from the landlord, you need to get a document signed by him or her stating such. The problem is how to go about it.

A sublet situation helps to a degree but does not resolve the matter. The best way is to see about a buy out of your position in the lease without recourse for a set sum of money where a sublet is also orchestrated at the same time. Note, the landlord is not obligated to accept such a proposal unless the presumed written lease has a provision mandating a buy out in it.


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