Am I liable for damages to a company vehicle if the accident happened on the job?

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Am I liable for damages to a company vehicle if the accident happened on the job?

I was working for a delivery company driving a 16 foot box truck my second day on the job, and second day ever driving a vehicle like that, I was finishing my run and 14 hour shift, when the guy training me told me to take a road he thought was a shortcut to take to get back up the mountain and to our office, he had me on a one lane dirt road that that truck was to large to be on and I had no way to turn around or even back out of the canyon because of hundred

foot drops. The truck got some scrapes and a gouge on the side of the box, they never really told me anything about the truck or what they were planning to do, so a little over a month after the incident they made employees sign a liability form, and shortly after i quit, and they aren’t wanting to give me my last check, they’re deciding whether or not they’re going to hold it back or just not give it to me. Now I’ve told them that it wasn’t my fault I was just following orders and they simply

Asked on July 21, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Arizona

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If the vehicle is insured, then the insurance company will pay for the damage. If the accident resulted in damage not covered by the insurer, the responsible party will pay (i.e. the at fault driver). The insurance on a company vehicle will typically be in the company name. However, in cases where the employee is the responsible party, the employee may be required to pay their employer back. Depending on how the employee was using the company car, it may also be the company who pays for damage caused by the accident.


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