Am I allowed to put boundary on property line at street

I purchased property behind my home. Someone just moved into the house next door to this property. They fenced in their back yard and then wanted to use my property to dig a pool and were doing things like hitting golf balls on my property toward my house. They didn’t like it when I didn’t allow them to use my property to dig their pool and totally tear it up with huge trucks and a crane. I had to fence the back of my property front on their street to keep them off my property. I checked with the city and made sure I left plenty of room between the street and my fence so they would have visibility getting in and out of their driveway so as not to be an obstruction. I am probably 8 feet from sidewalk which is then another approximately 3 feet from the street Now they are continually parking on the grass between the sidewalk and street. I put garden stakes along the curb to keep them from parking on the grass. My grass guy could not cut the grass because they were parked there and it is killing the grass in spots as well. They have started pulling up some of the stakes and bending others. What can I legally do at this point?

Asked on June 10, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Louisiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Whenever they park on your grass or property, call the police to ticket them--unless they are incredibly stupid or so rich that money does not matter to them (i.e. they don't care how much they pay in tickets), they will get the idea.
Sue them for any and all costs you incur, including relandscaping, etc.
Take digital photos of their cars, using a camera that time/date stamps, as proof for the legal proceedings.


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