After purchasing a used vehicle from a dealership, how much time do you have to return it?

My 83 yr. old mother purchased a used car from a Ford dealership in Bremen, GA that she cannot afford without consulting with the family.

Asked on June 26, 2016 under Business Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

There are some grounds under which your mother could try to return the car. If she was not mentally competent at the time (adjudged not competent by a court) her legal guardian could return it. If the dealership committed fraud--that is, lied to her about something important, or material, to get her to buy the car--that could give her grounds to return it. Or if the dealership breached the contract of sale, such as by not actually selling her the car identified in the contract, that breach could let her return it. But not being able to afford the car, unfortunately, is not a legal reason to return the car.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You don't have any time to return it unless the dealership voluntarily adopted a return policy (such as reflected in their marketing materials--e.g. their ads or website say that if not satisfied with your car, you can return it within a certain amount of time--or in the contract of sale, as a return provision in the contract). Otherwise, the law does not provide a right to return a used car in your state; the sale is final as soon as its completed.


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