What can I do if a credit account was opened in my name by a company without my authorization?

A lazer hair removal company opened a credit account in my name. I did not authorize this. I had intended to pay by credit card and I cancelled the services. They said they would refund the charge. This never happened. I disputed through GE that I did not authorize the account or the charge against it. They hey state they never received my documents and continued asking me to pay – which I stopped doing. The signature on the application is not authentically mine. After years of fighting, they removed the negative credit reporting but sold the bad debt to a collector.

Asked on August 18, 2011 Arizona

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you have a negative mark on your credit as a result of the credit account that was opened in your name that you did not authorize, there are companies that do credit repair for people such as you. You might consider retaining a company doing this type of service to assist in clearing up any lingering credit reporting results.

If the debt was sold to a collection agency, but no lawsuit has been filed yet, possibly the statute of limitations has passed to preclude any lawsuit.

As to the credit account opened in your name without your authorization, the way to possibly resolve this issue (even though this happened long ago) is to write this company a letter about what happened and address the fact that the account was not authorized by you. Keep a copy of the letter for future reference and in it, request a written response as to its intent in eliminating the debt assessed against you sold to a collection agency long ago.

Good luck.


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