13 year old a part of joint custody wants to spend a little more time with father and little sister and little brother on his way July 31st.

Even though joint, Mother fanagles things where she gets more than half the time. 13 year old really wished a 80/20 with Father knowing there will be same fnagling which would end in probable 60/40. When asking to be with Father all night Christmas eve, the Mother hangs up on 13 year old even if it means he stays home by himself just so Father and Father’s family does not see him. Like a jealousy issue, afraid he likes us more. Recently asked if he could stay a little longer, guilt trip and two hangups! Not thriving in school, Father gave into Mother, third year of summer school.

Asked on May 27, 2009 under Family Law, Missouri

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You need to talk to a good, tough divorce lawyer in your area.  One place you can look for qualified attorneys is our website, http://attorneypages.com

These are difficult, unpleasant situations.  Unfortunately, custodial parents do sometimes fail to honor the letter and the spirit of agreed parenting agreements, and enforcing them can be hard -- but you have to try.

In most states, a family court judge will listen to a 13-year-old.  Problems in school are a warning sign that is too familiar.  I wish you the best of luck with this.


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